Kids, Education And Teens

All of Related and Concerned with Kids, Education And Teens

Wednesday, January 7, 2009

Teen Boarding Schools- Teen Help is Here

Boarding schools are independent, college preparatory schools that provide housing facilities for students and faculty. Boarding schools are sometimes referred to as "intentional communities" because the faculty and staff at boarding schools work very hard to create an environment for students that is safe, academically challenging, active, and fun.

Boarding schools are well known for their academic excellence in helping troubled teens. With small class sizes, diverse curricula, and individual attention from teachers and advisor's, the boarding school experience gives students many distinct advantages. Boarding school students acquire the abilities that help ensure success in college and in life.

During the academic year, boarding schools become extended families where teachers and students live and learn together. The 24-hour community of a boarding school environment allows the faculty to seize every teachable moment whether in the classroom, on the playing field, or in the dormitory.

While boarding schools differ among these broad types, they also differ in their philosophy and mission. Because no two boarding schools are alike, matching a student with an appropriate boarding school is a big step toward ensuring future success. Teen Options can help guide you through this difficult process.

There are many schools today that are labeled, "boarding schools for troubled teens." They all have a little different twist on helping a teen that may be defiant, skipping school, or just failing in school due to a lack of effort or concern. Some are long term programs and some just 2 week programs. The shorter programs do not usually have an academic component to them. Some of these are punitive in nature and punish the child for not making an appropriate choice and some are very lenient. There are many in the middle with enough structure and discipline to accomplish the goal of getting the teen back on the right track.

In order for a boarding school to be helpful for a troubled teen proper care must be taken to find the appropriate type of boarding school. Some parents have tried to send their child to a traditional boarding school when a specialty boarding school or a boot camp type school is really what they need. A boarding school for a troubled teen will need to be highly structured and closely supervised. There are many advantages of sending your child to a boarding school for a troubled teen.

The first advantage to sending your teen to a troubled teen boarding school is the 24 hour supervision that he or she will receive. Most parents will eventually be worn down when they try to monitor their troubled teen's behavior.

Usually the parents work all day to provide for their family. While the parents are away at work the teen is usually home sleeping until late in the day. When the parents are ready to go to bed the problem teen is now fully rested and ready for a night of partying. This will typically interrupt either or both of the parents sleep time. Over a period of time this begins to affect their performance at work. Parents dealing with a troubled teen for several years will in some cases lose their job. This is a result of trying to keep their child out of trouble, the principles office and the juvenile system.

The second advantage to a parent with a child in a boarding school for troubled teens is that the parents have the ability to focus on their work and re-group as a family. This allows them to be better equipped to deal with the difficulties of a troubled teen when the child returns home.

The third advantage to a boarding school for troubled teens comes because the teen is usually placed far enough away from home that they are out of their comfort zone. In many cases they are far away from home enough that the customs, people and daily schedule are different.

The fourth advantage of a boarding school for troubled teens is that the child is away from their peers who are usually more of a negative influence than a positive one. Some parents have tried to place their child in a special day school close to home. In a day school the student is placed in a highly structured school during the day and then return home at night. The drawback to this is that they get with their negative friends at night and much of the progress of the day is undone. That is why we suggest a boarding school.

By: Jake Richey

Difference Between Online Education Vs. Traditional Education

These days, the internet has grown into a veritable wealth of information for college seekers. Everything from applying for financial aid to taking a course can be accomplished online. Now, a student can even obtain online degrees from one of many schools offering online education as a viable alternative to a traditional classroom education. How different are these two methods of teaching, and do either prove better for the student? There’s an abundance of information regarding online education, and distance education is becoming increasingly popular for students everywhere.

First and foremost, there are some obvious benefits in obtaining online degrees. For example, juggling a job, school and a home can be very difficult as far as commuting to the classroom every day. With online education, you eliminate the need to attend classes, and instead access your coursework from an internet website. This presents an obvious benefit to the overworked college student because his commute is basically slashed in half. What’s more, many distance education programs allow students to complete the coursework any time during the day, while still adhering to overall deadlines. This allows for flexibility that a traditional classroom setting can ordinarily not provide.

However, is an online education truly comparable to the type of education a student would receive in an actual classroom? Many professionals in the field say yes, and certainly students seeking online degrees can confirm this response. Not only does online learning provide a stimulating environment for students, but it promotes even interaction among every student because everyone has a say in classroom discussions. What’s more, online education programs allow each student to learn with the methods that work best for them. Plus, many employers respect online degrees as much as a traditional college degree, so there’s really no difference in the amount of education or respect a student will receive when attending an online college.

While traditional colleges will never be eliminated, there’s definitely been an increase in the amount of students attending online colleges in recent years. Many people choose to follow the online education route for the diversity of material they can find, or because the teachers are more approachable via the internet than they would be in a classroom setting. Students definitely need discipline and self-motivation to succeed in obtaining online degrees, but there’s still the same level of help and support from teachers and students online that there would be in a classroom. What’s more, internet college students are learning skills that will be beneficial to them in the workforce and beyond because of the way technology is evolving today.

Online degrees are becoming an increasingly popular way to obtain a college education and many students are turning to online education because of the quality of material, convenience and the level of flexibility inherent in distance education programs. Because there’s no distinct differences between an online education and a traditional education, students are assured they are receiving the same kind of education that they would in a brick and mortar setting. There are definite benefits to online degree programs, and students with discipline and motivation can and will succeed greatly in online education programs.

By: Harris Jhosta

Thursday, November 27, 2008

Strategies To Help You And Your Child Survive Homework

Is homework wreaking havoc in your home? If the answer is YES, then finding the real causes behind the homework problems, and taking steps to resolve them, will improve both school success and family harmony.

How do we know? Homework is the single biggest issue affecting home life, according to many of the parents who bring their children to us at STRONG Learning Centers®.

Here are the ten most common causes of homework problems, along with suggestions to help you resolve them.


If the homework is continuously too difficult, with everything that entails, then a child will try to avoid it. Look into the cause. Begin by having a conversation with the teacher. If the problem is class-wide, hopefully the teacher will evaluate and adjust the nature of his or her homework assignments. If the problem is limited to your child, she may require additional help from the teacher after school, from you, from a sibling, from a teenager you hire, or from a tutor. If this fails to resolve the issue, then a reevaluation of the type of class, or course level, or teaching vs. learning style, or school may be in order.

On the other hand, the cause of the problem may be a disability: physical, learning and/or attentional. Your child may have difficulty in such areas as: hearing, seeing, reading, processing language, or writing, or she may have ADD or ADHD. If the problem is one of these, sometimes it is easy to resolve. For example, corrective glasses can easily resolve some seeing issues and behavioral therapy and/or possibly medication might help AD/HD, the newer term for the disorder. In many cases, consulting teachers, counselors, or specialists in the appropriate field, might be in order.

Note: If you suspect AD/HD, a valuable resource is CHADD (Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder organization). For information on the learning disability (LD) issue in general, contact the Learning Disabilities Association of America (LDA).


When children chronically complain that assignments or directions are confusing, they are likely to become frustrated and/or anxious, eventually avoiding such assignments. Parents usually respond to these children by asking, "Weren't you listening?" Or "Just read the directions!" The children were listening or reading, but they may not have been able to process the information.

In this case, the cause may be reading comprehension and/or language processing problems. You may need to seek the help of teachers or a learning specialist to help your child learn strategies she can use to overcome or compensate for her disability. For example, she may need to put the words into pictures or graphic organizers. Children who become confused due to problems with language processing, do better when they can see things visually.

And, regardless of who is working with them, be sure they remain actively involved. Children (and adults too) are notorious for shaking their heads "yes" when asked "Do you understand?" even when they don't understand. Sometimes they are just yessing you and sometimes they think they understand. However, when you ask them to explain or discuss what you were just talking about, they realize that they really don’t understand.

If neither of these areas are the cause of the problem, then you may need to investigate why your child continues to complain. If it turns out it is simply a ploy to get you to do the work with him, then you need to address the reason for that behavior. But wait – before you get annoyed, remember what it was like for you when you were a child. Homework isn't always fun, and sometimes it's nice to have a little company. Your child may simply want your company during homework time. Wow! How's that for the ultimate compliment?


Sometimes homework assignments are low-quality boring busywork and children will avoid them simply because they don't want to do them. Unfortunately, one of life's little lessons that children need to learn is that sometimes we simply have to do boring things. If, however, every assignment appears to be dull, too easy, or too low-quality, you may need to talk to your child's teacher to determine the purpose of the assignments. Many teachers do not realize how some of the assignments are coming across to the children; chances are they will appreciate the feedback and adjust the work as appropriate.


He brings home the book and forgets the assignment. He brings home the assignment and forgets the book. Or he forgets the assignment and the book. Does this sound familiar? If so, it sounds like you've got yourself a disorganized child. The same is true for children who can’t judge time or can't manage their time. They may have the best intentions to get the homework done, but somehow it gets lost in their time-maze.

It is so difficult for disorganized children to get their homework done that some of them would rather lie, insisting that there is no homework, than be criticized and punished. If poor organizational skills seems to be the issue, there are many books and articles that offer great strategies to help the disorganized child. See, for example, pp 123-127 in Why Bad Grades Happen to Good Kids.


It's a fact; homework cuts into playtime. So what's the problem? The problem is that in some cases homework time creeps up to the point of consuming the home lives of the children and sometimes that of the family as well. Besides the obvious down side, this may be harmful to children's intellectual development. Their brains are developing and they need to use all parts, and good quality play provides opportunities to use the "far corners" of the brain that might otherwise remain fallow. So, it turns out that children need to play. Surprisingly, brain research indicates that occasional boredom is good, too, as it forces children to think of things to do — that is, to use their brains to create.

So if homework time seems to have taken over your home, work out a schedule with your child so that he doesn't have to lie in order to play.


Some parents are overly involved in their child's homework. Here are the three most common types, all of whom tend to drive their children toward lying and deception. If any of these describe you, then work to change your behavior.

A. The "perfectionist parents." Perfectionists demand picture-perfect-homework. Their children hate to let them see their homework papers out of fear that they will judge the work unworthy, tear it up, and make them do it again. Besides being tedious and time demanding, in these extreme cases it is downright disrespectful of the child.

B. The "helicopter parents." These parents hover over their children, making sure that every "t" is crossed and every "i" is dotted. They think they're being helpful, but here's the problem: By not giving their children any breathing room, they are delivering the tacit message that their children are not capable of doing the work themselves. Not only does this harm their self-esteem, but it also denies them the opportunity of taking responsibility for their own work.

C. The "Pandora parents." The children of Pandora parents tend to deny the existence of any homework they don't understand because asking Mom or Dad even the simplest question is tantamount to opening Pandora's box. Their well-meaning parents can't contain their enthusiasm and turn what would ordinary require a short answer into a long-winded treatise on some esoteric detail.


Most children don't want to do homework. But while they may put up quite a fuss, somehow they manage to get the work done. If they don't, motivation may not be the problem; they may appear unmotivated, but this may be a convincing protective screen they've set up to mask a larger issue.

For example, many children appear unmotivated when in fact they avoid homework to protect their egos. How's that? Because these children erroneously equate failure with stupidity. Their logic is as follows: If they try and fail, it is a reflection of their intelligence. If they don't try and fail, it is not a reflection of their intelligence; it is due to lack of motivation or irresponsibility. These labels they can live with; the label "stupid," they can't!


Many kids simply cannot keep up with the projects, tests, quizzes, reading and other assignments they are given.

Here is a general guide for the typical amount of time children should be expected to spend on homework each school day. Grades K-2, about 10-20 minutes. Grades 3-6, about 30-60 minutes. Grades 7-12 will vary considerably, depending on subjects, projects due, tests, etc., but a reasonable average is about two hours, with more on weekends, as needed, for major projects and exams.

If your child spends considerably more than this on homework, look into the cause. Begin by having a conversation with the teacher. If the problem is class-wide, hopefully the teacher will make adjustments. If the problem is limited to your child because your child works slowly, or has other issues discussed in this section, talk to his teacher and see what can be done to modify his assignments.


Many kids complain that they can't concentrate at home. Their siblings are running around, TVs and music systems are blaring, someone's on the phone, people are fighting, the dog is barking, the baby is crying. I don't know about you, but I need quiet to do work that requires thinking. Closed bedroom doors don't help much, as the muffled sounds of chaos always manage to get through.

Here is an idealistic solution. Even if it can't be carried out fully, at least it is something to aim for. As a family, consider designating a block of time as quiet time. Normal living continues, but more quietly than usual. Kids can use the time to do homework; parents can read, balance the checkbook, and write e-mails; those who have time to watch television can do so with headphones or the sound turned low. Sometimes quiet sounds pretty good, doesn't it?


Some children are lonely when required to do homework in their rooms, and don't work efficiently in that setting. Some need continuous support and direction. That is, they need someone to help them stay on task or to provide a little assistance when they get stuck. If required to work alone in their rooms, these are the kids who emerge three hours later with little or nothing accomplished. Both groups of children tend to prefer doing homework on the kitchen table. This way they have people around them, either for support or company.

So, if homework causes chaos in your home, look into the reasons. Once you find them, and do what you need to resolve the problems, you'll be back on the road to school success and family harmony.

by: Linda Bress Silbert, Ph.D. And Alvin J. Silbert, Ed.D.

(Originally published at the Strong Learning website and reprinted with permission of the authors, Linda Bress Silbert, Ph.D. and Alvin J. Silbert, Ed.D.)

Freeware Games And How To Find Them.

There are lots of different ways to have fun. A lot of what you choose depends on where you are in life, old or young. Today's youth enjoy computer-based gaming. There are many choices. Some of the games can be expensive, and gaming firms are getting a large portion of the spending money of the kids purchasing the games. Luckily, there are also a lot of freeware games. Game enthusiasts have made this a popular, and much cheaper, alternative for kids. A kid can download the game and play it with no charges involved.

So what's in it for the people who put these games online for free? Most of these individuals are enthusiastic gamers who simply love to develop and produce new and exciting games. Freeware is simply a way for them to get their product out there are share it with likeminded others. It's sort of an "open mic night" for video games.

Furthermore, freeware games often serve as a means to display their grudges against the developers of proprietary games. Say if a gaming enthusiast believes that some feature of a popular proprietary game is not up to the mark, he will try to build a game with similar objective and playing rules with the improved feature that was missing in the original proprietary game.

There is no dearth of variety in freeware games. You can choose a freeware game from adventure online games (, shooting online games, driving games online (, strategic games online etc. Lately, there has been considerable variety of games within these broad groups.

Freeware games ( are often supported by the existence of pay-per-click ads. Usually freeware sites will feature a few advertisements, and if they are clicked, the site owner gets a small amount of money in return. At the end of a specified period, the dollar amount of all the clicks is tabulated and the owner is presented with his payment.

Until recently, freeware games were not concentrated on creativity and novelty. On the other hand, there have been drastic changes lately. These days one can take part in role playing games with a huge number of participants at no charge. One can also create one's own simulation inside the online worlds. There is an infinite range of possibilities.

by: Aiden Zapora